1.  
  2. razorshapes:

    Vivian Maier

    "In 2007 Chicago 26-year-old real estate agent (and president of the Jefferson Park Historical Society) John Maloof walked into an auction house and placed a $380 bid on a box of 30,000 prints and negatives from an unknown photographer. Realizing the street photographs of 1950s/60s era Chicago and New York were of unusually high quality he purchased another lot of photographer’s work totaling some 100,000 photographic negatives, thousands of prints, 700 rolls of undeveloped color film, home movies, audio tape interviews, and original cameras.

    Over time it became clear the photos belonged to a Chicago nanny named Vivian Maier who had photographed prolifically for nearly 40 years, but who never shared her work during her lifetime. Since the discovery Maier’s photographs have received international attention with collections touring in cities around the world as well as the publication of a book.”

    (via silhouettesofspilledink)

     
  3. lomographicsociety:

    Erika Simmons’ ‘Ghost in the Machine’

    Self-taught artist Erika Simmons has found a beautiful, fitting way to pay tribute to an old yet beloved form of technology. Check out her series “Ghost in the Machine”: 

     
  4. (Source: flyartproductions, via whoreva)

     
  5. (via whoreva)

     
  6. thepureskin:

    My skin feels elusive 
    Perhaps it might be because
    Your lips haven’t graced
    This phantom of a body
    In over 16 weeks

    lovely submission. thanks anon

    (via nefiasou)

     
  7. fabulousfilms:

    Lolita (1962, Stanley Kubrick)

     
  8. (Source: stayhighman, via phillatioh)

     
  9. (Source: 40licks, via classy-lovely)

     
  10. Audrey Hepburn, 1955.

    (via welcome-to-your-hell)

     
  11.  
  12. ”If this was really a joke then it wouldn’t be a joke so cruel.”

    (Source: andreii-tarkovsky, via welcome-to-your-hell)

     
  13. fabulousfilms:

    Lolita (1962, Stanley Kubrick)

     
  14.  
  15. was-ka:

    sometimes 
    its nice to go against what people are used to seeing 

    (via california-yankee)